Directory of Scholars

The International and Comparative Law & Courts Collaborative has over 180 members from around the world and across several disciplines. Below you can check out individual scholar expertise, research, and contact information.

The directory is intended to help scholars, students, and media requests to be guided towards experts in their respective fields. Our community of scholars integrates research from a variety of different methodological and epistemological perspectives, and highlights scholars and scholarship that may be in a variety of languages. Please take a look at scholars’ websites and contact them directly for any inquiries.

Bjöern Dressel

Dr. Bjöern Dressel is an Associate Professor at the Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National University (ANU). His research is concerned with issues of comparative constitutionalism, judicial politics and governance and public sector reform in Asia. He has published in a range of international journals, including Governance; Administration & Society; International Political Science Review, and Pacific Review. He is the editor of The Judicialization of Politics in Asia (Routledge, 2012) and co-editor of Politics and Constitutions in Southeast Asia (Routledge, 2016) and From Aquino II to Duterte: Continuity, Change–and Rupture (ISEAS 2019).

Email: Bjoern.Dressel@anu.edu.au 

Twitter: @BjoernDressel

Raul Sanchez-Urribarri 

Dr. Raul Sanchez-Urribarri is a Senior Lecturer in Crime, Justice and Legal Studies at the Department of Social Inquiry, La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia). He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of South Carolina, an LL.M. from Cambridge University and a Law Degree from Universidad Catolica Andres Bello (Caracas, Venezuela).  His research focuses on democracy, rule of law and comparative judicial studies, with an emphasis on Latin America and Venezuela in particular. His work has been published in a variety of outlets, including The Journal of Politics, Law and Social Inquiry, the Annual Review of Law and Social Sciences, International Political Science Review and The Hague Journal on the Rule of Law, among others. He is a Non-Resident Research Fellow at Tulane University’s Center for Inter-American Policy and Research, and a Co-Editor at Thesis Eleven Journal. He served as Chair of the Section on Venezuelan Studies (SVS) of the Latin American Studies Association in 2020-2022.

Email:  r.sanchezu@latrobe.edu.au

Twitter:  @rasurri 

Webpage:  https://scholars.latrobe.edu.au/r2sanchezurr

Tom Gerald Daly

Dr. Tom Gerald Daly is Deputy Director of the University of Melbourne School of Government, Director and founder of the global research platform Democratic Decay & Renewal (DEM-DEC) and Co-Convenor of the Constitution Transformation Network. Tom’s globally-focused comparative and cross-disciplinary public law research focuses on the democratic legitimacy of courts, global democratic decay and renewal, and regional integration. Publications include a monograph with Cambridge University Press, The Alchemists: Questioning Our Faith in Courts as Democracy-Builders, and articles on court-packing, backlash against courts, the interaction between national and international courts, and judicial networks and leadership in leading journals including the International Journal of Constitutional Law. Relevant government and consultancy roles include clerking for the Chief Justice of Ireland (2005-2011), designing a pan-continental African Judicial Network for the African Union, and managing a US$3.5m Council of Europe judicial ethics project in Turkey.

Email: thomas.daly@unimelb.edu.au

Twitter: @DemocracyTalk

Webpage: www.democratic-decay.org and https://government.unimelb.edu.au/staff/tom-daly

Richard Albert

Professor Richard Albert is Professor of World Constitutions and Director of Constitutional Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He has published over twenty books on democratic reform and constitutional change, including Constitutional Amendments: Making, Breaking, and Changing Constitutions (Oxford University Press). He is Co-President of the International Society of Public Law, founding director of the International Forum on the Future of Constitutionalism, and a former law clerk to the Chief Justice of Canada. Born and raised in Canada, Richard Albert holds law and political science degrees from Yale, Oxford and Harvard.

Email: richard.albert@law.utexas.edu 

Twitter: @richardalbert 

Webpage: https://www.richardalbert.com

Maria Adelaida Ceballos-Bedoya 

Maria Adelaida Ceballos-Bedoya is a doctoral candidate at McGill’s Faculty of Law and an O’Brien Fellow at the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. A Colombian lawyer with a master’s degree in sociology, Maria is currently studying gender inequalities in the Colombian judiciary. More specifically, her doctoral project examines the factors that facilitate or hinder the entry of women to different levels of the judiciary in a context of state weakness, as found in Colombia. In 2020, she received the National Scholarship Vanier awarded by the Social Sciences, Humanities, and Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Before starting her Ph.D., Maria worked as a researcher at the Centre for the Study of Law, Justice, and Society (Dejusticia), a Colombian think tank dedicated to human rights research and strategic litigation in favour of vulnerable groups in Latin America. During her time at Dejusticia, Maria co-authored two books on justice and the legal profession with Dr. Mauricio García-Villegas. She also gained extensive teaching experience at EAFIT University (Medellin, Colombia), where she taught courses on the Sociology of Law and Constitution and Citizenship

Email: maria.ceballos@mail.mcgill.ca

Twitter: @mayaceballos3

Zachary Elkins

Dr. Zachary Elkins is Associate Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas.  His research focuses on issues of democracy, institutional reform, research methods, and national identity, with an emphasis on cases in Latin America. He is currently completing a book manuscript, Steal this Constitution: The Drift and Mastery of Constitutional Design, which examines the design and diffusion of democratic institutions.  Much of his research is on the origins and consequences of national constitutions.  With Tom Ginsburg (University of Chicago), Professor Elkins co-directs both the Comparative Constitutions Project, a NSF-funded initiative to understand the causes and consequences of constitutional choices, and the website Constitute, which provides resources and analysis for constitutional drafters in new democracies. Elkins earned his B.A. from Yale University, an M.A. from the University of Texas at Austin, and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Email: zelkins@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @zedtexw

Webpage: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/government/faculty/elkinszs and https://sites.google.com/site/zachelkinstexas/

David Schultz

David Schultz is Distinguished University Professor in the Departments of Political Science, Environmental Studies, and Legal Studies  at Hamline University. He is also a professor of Law at the University of Minnesota.  A three-time Fulbright scholar who has taught extensively in Europe and Asia, and the winner of the Leslie A. Whittington national award for excellence in public affairs teaching, David  is the author of more than 40 books and 200+ articles on various aspects of American politics, election law, and the media and politics, and he is regularly interviewed and quoted in the local, national, and international media on these subjects including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, the Economist, and National Public Radio.   His most recent books are Constitutional Precedent in US Supreme Court Reasoning (2022), Handbook of Election Law (2022), and Presidential Swing States (2022).  

Email: dschultz@hamline.edu

Twitter: @ProfDschultz

Webpage:  https://works.bepress.com/david_schultz/

Ranieri L. Resende

Dr. Ranieri L. Resende is Postdoctoral Researcher at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ, Brazil, 2021-23), where he obtained his PhD. in Law, and was Visiting Doctoral Researcher for the academic year 2017-18 at the New York University School of Law (NYU, U.S.), and Excellence Fellow of the Rio de Janeiro Research Foundation (FAPERJ, Brazil, 2018-19). Recently, Ranieri assumed the position of Visiting Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law (MPIL, Germany, 2020). His doctoral dissertation was focused on the Precedent of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, which part was sequentially published by the Northwestern Journal of Human Rights and the New York University Public Law & Legal Theory Research Paper Series (No. 19-11) . During his MSc. in Law studies at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG, Brazil), Ranieri has dedicated to the International Law field and was admitted as Visiting Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute, Heidelberg. His Master thesis was partially published in the Goettingen Journal of International Law under the title “Normative Heterogeneity and International Responsibility: Another View on the World Trade Organization and its System of Countermeasures”, and it was honorably included in the selective Oxford Bibliographies (2015). His book on international responsibility was also included in the Oxford Bibliographies, as one of the best works on international law published in Portuguese Language (2021). Besides these papers, Ranieri has published in many scientific journals, conference proceedings and collective books in Brazil and abroad, especially in the fields of International Protection of Human Rights, Inter-American System, International Responsibility, Democracy, Constitutionalism, Judicial Review, Fundamental Rights, and Transitional Justice. Some of his works were quoted by the Brazilian Supreme Court in recent important precedents (e.g.: Asbestos Cases, Provisional Execution of Criminal Sentence Cases), as well as by legal scholars in several countries.

Email: ranieri@ranieriresende.com

Twitter: ranieri_resende

Webpage: http://www.ranieriresende.com

Julio Ríos-Figueroa

Dr. Julio Ríos-Figueroa is Associate Professor at the Department of Law at ITAM in Mexico City. Ríos-Figueroa received his Ph.D. in Politics from New York University (NYU). His research focuses on comparative judicial politics, the rule of law, and empirical legal studies with an empirical focus on the Latin American region. Ríos-Figueroa is the author of Constitutional Courts as Mediators. Armed Conflict, Civil-Military Relations, and the Rule of Law in Latin America as well as co-editor with Gretchen Helmke of the volume Courts in Latin America both published by Cambridge University Press. Professor Ríos-Figueroa has been a Hauser Research Scholar at the NYU School of Law, Visiting Professor at the Juan March Institute in Madrid, O’Gorman Fellow at Columbia University’s Institute of Latin American Studies, and Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at Stanford´s CASBS. He was the editor of Política y gobierno (2014-2018).

Email: julio.rios@itam.mx

Twitter: @JulioRiosFigue1

Webpage: https://rios-figueroa.com/

Aníbal Pérez-Liñán

Dr. Aníbal Pérez-Liñán is Professor of Political Science and Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame, where he serves as Director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. His research focuses on political institutions, the rule of law, and human rights in new democracies. He is co-principal investigator of the Notre Dame Reparations Design and Compliance Lab, and he was editor in chief of the Latin American Research Review (2016-21), the scholarly journal of the Latin American Studies Association, LASA. He is the author of Presidential Impeachment and the New Political Instabilityin Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2007), and Democracies and Dictatorships in Latin America (with Scott Mainwaring, Cambridge University Press, 2013).  

Email: aperezl1@nd.edu

Twitter: @aperezli

Webpage: https://anibalperezlinan.com/

Maoz Rosenthal

Dr. Maoz Rosenthal is a Senior Lecturer at the Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy, and Strategy at Reichman University (IDC, Herzliya), a co-Chair of the Israeli Policy Agenda Project, and the secretary of the Israeli Political Science Association. He studies the interaction between strategy and structure in a variety of political arenas, with a focus on the Israeli case. Recent publications include “Judicial Review in a Defective Democracy” published in the Journal of Law and Courts (2021), “Strategic agenda setting and Prime Ministers’ approval ratings: the heresthetic and rhetoric of political survival” in British Politics (2021), and the book Israel’s Governability Crisis: Quandaries, Unstructured Institutions and Adaptation (2017) published by Rowman and Littlefield.

Email: mrosenthal@idc.ac.il

Twitter: @maoz.ro

Webpage: https://www.runi.ac.il/en/faculty/mrosenthal/

Pedro C. Magalhães

Dr. Pedro C. Magalhães is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Social Sciences of the University of Lisbon, and the Director of PASSDA  the research infrastructure in charge of implementing the European Social Survey, the Portuguese Election Study and other comparative social surveys in Portugal. His research focuses on public opinion, elections, and constitutional politics. Recent works include studies of public trust in courts in Europe, published in West European Politics and Social Science Quarterly.

Email: pedro.magalhaes@ics.ul.pt

Twitter: @PCMagalhaes

Webpage: http://www.pedro-magalhaes.org

Aude Lejeune

Dr. Aude Lejeune is a CNRS research fellow in sociology at the CERAPS, University of Lille, France. Her research focuses on access to justice, legal mobilization and social inequalities. She recently published her work in Law & Society Review (2019, with J. Ringelheim), Comparative European Politics (2020), International Journal of Law in Contexts (2021, with A. Spire), Disability and Society (2021), Current History (2022) and Sociologie et Sociétés (2022).

Email: aude.lejeune@univ-lille.fr

Twitter: @audelejeune

Webpage: https://sites.google.com/site/audelejeune/home and https://pro.univ-lille.fr/aude-lejeune/

Risa Kitagawa Amano

Dr. Risa Kitagawa Amano is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at Northeastern University. Her research focuses on the politics of transitional justice efforts that address a legacy of political violence and conflict. She is interested more broadly in human rights violations, post-conflict processes, public opinion, and experimental research. Her work appears or is forthcoming in World Politics and Journal of Conflict Resolution, and her first book project uses econometric and survey-experimental methods to investigate transitional justice policymaking in post-conflict states and its downstream consequences for reconciliation. Recent projects explore the impact of political apologies, the relationship between human rights trials and public opinion, and the efficacy of transitional justice policies in restoring political legitimacy. She is currently a Faculty Affiliate of the Global Resilience Institute and Asian Studies Program at Northeastern and a Faculty Associate of the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations at Harvard University, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University (2017) and a B.A. in international relations and French from New York University (2009). Prior to joining Northeastern, she was a Postdoctoral Research Scholar in the Department of Political Science at Columbia University.

Email: r.kitagawa@northeastern.edu

Twitter: @kitagawarisa

Webpage: https://www.risakitagawa.com

Vanessa A. Baird

Dr. Vanessa A. Baird joined the faculty of the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2000. Her book, Answering the Call of the Court: How Justices and Litigants Set the Supreme Court’s Agenda, was published in 2007 by the University of Virginia Press. She has spent her career investigating the factors that strengthen the rule of law in seemingly unrelated fields: institutional agenda setting, the psychology of legitimacy perceptions, and the various ways people seek to redress their grievances: litigation, political participation, and violence. She is working on a book that explores the ways in which psychological and social insecurities can both bolster and undermine support for the rule of law (including support for violence). Her latest work focuses on explaining why the Supreme Court is institutionally limited in forging comprehensive liberal economic change (regardless of justices’ preferences). She also has been working on testing her original ideas about critical thinking in science education that she hopes will make early undergraduate education more effective and equitable (yet easier on instructors!)

Email: Vanessa.Baird@colorado.edu

Twitter: @real_prof_baird

Webpage: https://vbaird.com/

Rachel Ann Hulvey

Rachel Ann Hulvey is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania with research interests broadly spanning international law, international security, and Chinese foreign policy. Her dissertation project, Mobilizing for Sovereignty, theorizes about changes in international law due to the influence of a rising power in cyberspace. Even as material power accumulates, China uses socialization to mobilize support for new rules and institutions by framing change as supporting state sovereignty. As China seeks to establish new rules of the game, would some countries join the Beijing-led order and, if so, which? She develops a theory of hegemonic socialization explaining which countries gravitate toward China’s vision of world order when competing against establishing liberal ideas of Internet freedom.

Email: hulvey@sas.upenn.edu

Twitter: @RachelHulvey

Webpage: https://rachelhulvey.com

Aylin Aydin-Cakir

Dr. Aylin Aydin-Cakir is lecturer at Political Science and Public Administration Program at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Before joining VU, she worked as Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yeditepe University in Turkey (2014-2019). In 2017 she has been awarded with the Young Scientist Award (BAGEP) by the Science Academy in Turkey. Between 2018-2019 she has been research fellow at “Constitutional Politics in Turkey” program at Humboldt University in Berlin. In 2020 she was Re:consitution fellow at Montaigne Center (Utrecht University, School of Law) and in 2021 visiting researcher at ERI research center at Utrecht University, School of Law. Her research interests focus on judicial politics, court-curbing, comparative political institutions, public trust in the legal system and authoritarian regimes. She has published in various journals such as Political Research Quarterly, International Political Science Review, Law&Society Review, Democratization, International Journal of Constitutional Law (ICON), and Turkish Studies.

Email: aylinaydin80@gmail.com

Twitter: @aylin_aydin

Webpage: https://research.vu.nl/en/persons/aylin-aydin-cakir

Sara McLaughlin Mitchell

Dr. Sara McLaughlin Mitchell is the F. Wendell Miller Professor of Political Science and the College of Law (courtesy appointment) at the University of Iowa. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science at Michigan State University in 1997. She is author of six books including Domestic Law Goes Global: Legal Traditions and International Courts (Cambridge University Press, 2011) and What Do We Know About War? (Rowman Littlefield 2021) and she has published more than sixty journal articles and book chapters. She is the recipient of several major research awards from the Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, and USAID. Her areas of expertise include international conflict, political methodology, and gender issues in academia. Professor Mitchell is co-founder of the Journeys in World Politics workshop, a mentoring workshop for junior women studying international relations. She is the recipient of several research, teaching, and graduate mentoring awards from the University of Iowa, the Quincy Wright Distinguished Scholar Award (2015) from the International Studies Association, a distinguished alumni award from Iowa State University, and she served as President of the Peace Science Society. 

Email: sara-mitchell@uiowa.edu

Twitter: @sbmitche 

Webpage: http://saramitchell.org/

Sultan Mehmood

Dr. Sultan Mehmood is a Professor of Economics at the New Economic School, Moscow. A faculty research fellow at Centre for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP), Pakistan Institute of Development Studies (PIDE) and Paris Research University (PSL). He graduated from University of Paris in 2019 with a PhD in Economics. His research interests are in development economics and political economy. His research seeks to understand the conditions for establishment of rule of law in societies and its consequences for institutional design and development.  

Email: smehmood@nes.ru

Twitter: @mrsultan713

Webpage: www.sultanmehmood.info

Abigail Hassett

Her research broadly examines judicial ambition, seeking to both define and quantify this complicated measure. Decades of judicial research assumes that ambition exists, but fails to break down how this phenomenon interacts with or creates other facets of judicial behavior. By furthering our understanding of why and how people seek to become judges, we are better able to understand judicial behavior as a whole. She also studies international courts and criminal prosecutions.

Email: ahassett@email.sc.edu

Twitter: @avhassett
Webpage: https://avhassett.wordpress.com

Adam Chilton

His primary research interests lie at the intersection of international law, comparative law, and empirical legal studies. His research includes mixed methods approaches to examining whether including rights in constitutions improves protection of human rights, documenting the development and enforcement of competition law regimes around the world, studying how bilateral labor agreements can be used to promote international labor migration, and researching how to improve the quality of life in India’s slums. In addition to these international and comparative projects, Adam researches the ideology of the American legal profession, judicial decision making, and how to improve the legal academy.

Email: adamchilton@uchicago.edu

Twitter: @adamschilton
Webpage: http://www.adamchilton.org

Alex Schwartz

His research focuses on comparative constitutional law, judicial politics and judicial behavior. Some of his previous work has been about constitutional courts in divided societies, including Bosnia, Northern Ireland, Europe, and Asia. More recently Alex has been researching court curbing, particularly when associated with populist politics.

Email: schwartz@hku.hk

Twitter: @AlexDSchwartz

Webpage: https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/alexanderschwartz/#researchinterestshttps://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/alexanderschwartz/#researchinterests

Alexander Hudson

His research focuses on constitution-making processes, constitutional referenda, comparative constitutionalism, and comparative judicial behavior. In particular, his interests include the effects of public and political party participation in constitution-making processes and minority rights, such as those in Iceland, South Africa, and Brazil.

Email:

Twitter:

Webpage:

Alice J. Kang

Her research focuses on women, gender, and politics with a world regional focus on Africa. Specifically, she investigates the role of women’s movements and conservative movements in making women’s rights policy in Niger and traces the rise of women judges on high courts globally. She also examines the effects of external threats on gender bias, women legislative representation, and litigation on women’s rights.

Email: akang2@unl.edu

Twitter: @kangalicej

Webpage: https://sites.google.com/site/alicejkang/about-me?authuser=0

Alison Dundes Renteln

Her research studies international law, human rights, comparative legal systems, Constitutional law and legal and political theory. An expert on cultural rights, including the use of the “cultural defense” in the legal system.

Email: arenteln@usc.edu

Webpage: https://dornsife.usc.edu/cf/faculty-and-staff/faculty.cfm?pid=1003632

Allyson Yankle

Her research broadly focuses on questions of judicial politics and behavior both in the American and comparative contexts. Of particular interest is how courts and judges operate in different institutional contexts, judicial goals and motivations, and ultimately issues of judicial legitimacy. Her research agenda currently includes qualitatively applying theories of judicial bargaining on the U.S. Supreme Court to understand the expression of legal goals in majority opinions; examining judicial ethics and judicial conduct commissions, including the relationship between judicial ethics offenses and judicial discipline, how the media covers ethics violations, and the electoral implications following judicial misconduct; and, finally, considering decision-making and compliance mechanisms at the European Court of Human Rights.

Email: ayankle@radford.edu

Webpage: https://www.radford.edu/content/chbs/home/political-science/about/dr-allyson-yankle.html

Amanda Driscoll

Her research and teaching interests center on comparative democratic institutions of modern Latin America. Her published and ongoing work considers the institutional architecture of all modern democracies, including elections, executives, legislatures and courts.

Email: adriscoll@fsu.edu

Twitter: @dra_driscoll
Webpage: https://www.amandadriscoll.xyz

Amanda Melillo de Matos

Her research interests center on comparative and qualitative research on the decision-making processes of the Supreme Courts of Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico. She focuses on assessing how their decision-making behavior approaches or distances itself from the ideal of deliberation in constitutional courts, and identifies institutional mechanisms and decision-making practices correlated with decision-making stages of better or worse deliberative performance.

Email: amandamelillo@usp.br

Webpage: https://constituicao.direito.usp.br/team-member/amanda-melillo-de-matos/

Andrea Castagnola

She is an expert in the areas of transparency, justice, institutions, accountability, and fighting corruption. She examines the rule of law in Latin America, including judicial independence and manipulation, as well as gender diversification in high courts. Her background in econometrics has enabled her to combine quantitative research with qualitative research in her areas of expertise.

Email: andreacastagnols@yahoo.com

Twitter: @castagnola_a

Webpage: http://www.andreacastagnola.com

Rebecca A Reid

Dr. Rebecca A. Reid is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at El Paso. Her research interests include judicial politics, comparative courts, international law, human rights, indigenous law, gender, and diversification and inclusion. More specifically, she examines how courts and judges make decisions, the impact of these decisions on the rule of law and human rights, and the development and interaction of laws across international and domestic spheres.  She examines US courts, Mexican Supreme Court, common law courts, and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. She has published research in journals such as Political Research QuarterlyAmerican Politics ResearchJournal of Law and Courts, the Justice System Journal, and PS: Political Science & Politics.

Email: rareid@utep.edu

Twitter: @Rebecca_A_Reid

Webpage: www.reidrebecca.com

Chris Kendall

Chris Kendall is Associate Professor of Politics and Government, specializing in International Relations. He earned his law degree from UC Berkeley (Boalt Hall) and practiced law in New York before completing his PhD in politics at Princeton University. His teaching is informed by research interests at the intersection of international relations, comparative politics, and judicial processes. Professor Kendall is particularly interested in how international law is adopted, resisted, and transformed by developing states. His current research examines how judicial politics in Latin America and Africa shape and constrain the enforcement of international human rights commitments at the local and regional levels.

Email: ckendall@pugetsound.edu

Webpage:

https://www.pugetsound.edu/directory/chris-kendall

Whitney K. Taylor

Whitney K. Taylor is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at San Francisco State University. Her research focuses on law and courts, state-society relations, and legal consciousness and mobilization. Her work has been published ina range of journals, including Comparative Political Studies,Comparative Politics​, ​Government & Opposition,Law & Society Review, andLaw & Social Inquiry. She is working on book manuscripts on (1) the embedding of constitutional law and (2) claim-making as a form of everyday citizenship practice.

Email: wktaylor@sfsu.edu

Twitter: @w_k_taylor

Webpage: https://whitneyktaylor.weebly.com/

Rachel Schoner

Rachel Schoner is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego. Her research explores non-state actor access in international institutions and the role individuals play in global politics. Her dissertation analyzes how political actors mobilize in international legal institutions to improve respect for human rights. She uses a variety of methods in her research including collection of original data, elite interviews, qualitative case studies, and cross-national quantitative analysis.

Email: rschoner@ucsd.edu 

Twitter: @rjschoner

Webpage: www.rjschoner.com 

Mark Fathi Massoud

Mark Fathi Massoud is professor of politics and legal studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he directs the Legal Studies Program and serves as affiliated faculty with the Center for the Middle East and North Africa. Massoud also holds an appointment as a Visiting Professor at the University of Oxford Faculty of Law. He is the author of Law’s Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan, which received the Law and Society Association Herbert Jacob Book Prize, and Shari’a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics, which received the Socio-Legal Studies Association Hart-SLSA Book Prize. 

Email: mmassoud@ucsc.edu

Twitter: @ProfMassoud

Webpage: people.ucsc.edu/mmassoud

Christina Bambrick

Christina Bambrick is assistant professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. She specializes in constitutional theory and development, and her research and teaching interests range from American and comparative constitutionalism to republican theory and the history of political thought. Bambrick is completing a book manuscript, under contract with Cambridge, considering the horizontal application of rights to non-state actors in comparative context. The book studies shifting understandings of public and private spaces in comparative constitutionalism, specifically in the United States, India, Germany, South Africa, and the European Union. Bambrick is a Kellogg Institute faculty fellow at Notre Dame. She earned a doctorate in government from the University of Texas at Austin and previously taught at Clemson University.

Email: cbambrick@nd.edu

Twitter: @crbambrick4

Webpage: christinabambrick.com

Hélène Tyrrell

Hélène Tyrrell is a Lecturer in Law at Newcastle Law School. Her research focuses on courts and judges, human rights, and administrative law. Her monograph, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018) was a runner-up for the Society of Legal Scholars Peter Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship and is long-listed for the Inner Temple Book Prize 2022 (Main Prize). Hélène’s work on human rights in the UK has contributed to various UK Government consultations and been cited in Parliamentary Committee reports. In January 2022, Hélène gave oral evidence to the Joint Committee on Human Rights, on the subject of the proposed reform of the Human Rights Act 1998.   Her teaching areas cover constitutional law, administrative law, human rights, tort law and judicial studies. She has taught at the University of Durham, Queen Mary University of London and at the University of Lille, in Paris. At Newcastle, Hélène leads first year the Administrative Law and Human Rights’ module and ‘Foundations of Legal Skills’ programme. Hélène was named ‘Law Teacher of the Year’ at the Northern Law Awards 2018. 

Email: helene.tyrrell@newcastle.ac.uk

Twitter: @DrHeleneTyrrell

Webpage: https://www.ncl.ac.uk/law/people/profile/helenetyrrell.html

Lewis Graham

Dr. Lewis Graham is a Fellow in Law at Wadham College at the University of Oxford. He researches and publishes in areas related to judges and judging, administrative law and human rights law, and his work has been cited by politicians, judges at the European Court of Human Rights and the President of the UK Supreme Court. He has taught various subjects at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and regularly produces content for legal charities and NGOs.  He is currently working on projects relating to judicial behaviour on the UK Supreme Court and European Court of Human Rights.

Email: lewis.graham@wadham.ox.ac.uk

Twitter: @LewisGrahamLaw

Webpage:

https://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/lewis-grahamhttps://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/people/lewis-graham

Mishella Romo Rivas

Mishella Romo Rivas is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. She obtained a BA in Political Science and Jurisprudence and an MA in Law and Governance from Montclair State University. She has an MA in Politics from New York University. She is interested in presidentialism, populism and judicial politics. She has presented her research at the annual meetings of the American Political Science Association and the Northeastern Political Science Association. She has written and co-authored papers that have been published by the American Political Science Association, the National Political Science Honor Society, Latin American Perspectives, and the Oxford Handbook of Latin American Social Movements. At Princeton, Mishella is conducting research on the politics of horizontal accountability and court legitimacy in Latin America. 

Email: Msrivas@princeton.edu

Twitter: @MishellaRomo

Webpage:  https://politicalsciencenow.com/meet-dfp-spring-fellow-mishella-romo-rivas-princeton-university/

Michael Catalano

Michael Catalano is a Ph.D Candidate in Political Science at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Binghamton. His research interests include law and courts, US constitutional law, judicial independence, US state courts, and court curbing. His research focuses primarily on the motivations of democratic institutions (i.e., legislatures, executives, political parties, and nomination and selection systems) to constrain or empower courts and the implications of those actions on judicial behavior. His dissertation explores the motivations for and implications of court curbing in the US states. In his dissertation, Michael introduces novel measures of court curbing with a comprehensive dataset of court curbing in the US states. He constructs a theory of ex ante and ex post control mechanisms to explain variation in court curbing across states and time. Finally, he determines the effects of court curbing on judicial behavior in US state courts. He also has two collaborative projects focusing on how the public can influence extrajudicial behavior. His work has been published in Political Research QuarterlyJournal of Political Institutions and Political Parties, and has had an article conditionally accepted in Justice System Journal.

Email: mcatala4@binghamton.edu

Twitter: @M_A_Catalano

Webpage: https://catalanopolisci.weebly.com/

Kim Lane Scheppele

Professor Kim Lane Scheppele is the Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs in School of Public and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Scheppele’s work focuses on the intersection of constitutional and international law, particularly in constitutional systems under stress. After 1989, Professor Scheppele studied the emergence of constitutional law in Hungary and Russia, living in both places for extended periods. After 9/11, she researched the effects of the international “war on terror” on constitutional protections around the world. Since 2010, she has been documenting the rise of autocratic legalism first in Hungary and then in Poland, as well as its spread around the world.  Most recently, she has written extensively about the response of  European Union institutions and European law to rule of law challenges.  Her many publications in law reviews, in social science journals, and in many languages cover these topics and others. Professor Scheppele is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the International Academy of Comparative Law. In 2014, she received the Law and Society Association’s Kalven Prize for influential scholarship. She held tenure in the political science department at the University of Michigan, was a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, was the founding director of the gender program at Central European University Budapest, directed the Program in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton for a decade, and has held visiting faculty positions in the law schools at Michigan, Yale, Harvard, Erasmus/Rotterdam, and Humboldt/Berlin.  From 2017-2019, she was the elected President of the Law and Society Association. She is currently a member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Constitutional Law, elected as a “global jurist.” 

Email: kimlane@princeton.edu

Twitter: @KimLaneLaw

Webpage:  https://sociology.princeton.edu/people/kim-lane-scheppele

Susan Achury

Susan Achury is an assistant professor in the Political Science department at Lycoming College. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Houston, a master’s degree in political science from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a law degree from La Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Her research focuses on how the design of judicial review affects democratic legitimacy and accountability. Specifically, how accessibility and the scope of justiciability shape the courts’ intervention in the policymaking process in Latin America. Her research also evaluates gender and racial representation in the US judiciary and its connection with the court legitimacy. 

Email: achury@lycoming.edu

Twitter: @SusanAchury 

Webpage: https://www.susanachury.com/

Jennifer Bowie

Dr. Jennifer Bowie is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Richmond and the former Editor of the Law and Politics Book Review. Her research and scholarly work examines judicial decision-making on the US and comparative courts. Jennifer is the recipient of a collaborative multi-year National Science Foundation grant totaling more than $300,000. The funded project titled “Dynamic Learning in Comparative Courts: A Cross-National Analysis of Judicial Decision Making in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom” advances a new and innovative theoretical framework on the dynamic transmission of information between two tiers of courts across the judiciaries of Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. She has published research in several peer-reviewed journals and edited book volumes, including the Journal of PoliticsPolitical Research QuarterlyOsgoode Hall Law JournalJustice System Journal, and the Journal of Law and Courts. She is a co-author of A View from the Bench and Chambers: Examining Judicial Process and Decision Making on the US Court of Appeals (University of Virginia Press, 2014). Jennifer is also the recipient of the American Political Science Association Law and Courts Section Teaching and Mentoring Award (2020) and the Distinguished Educator Award at the University of Richmond (2020). Recently, she was awarded a University of Richmond Provost Fellowship (2022-2023) for her scholarship and work mentoring student research. 

Email: jbowie@richmond.edu

Twitter: @JenniferBowie9

Webpage: https://polisci.richmond.edu/faculty/jbowie/

Tommaso Pavone

Tommaso Pavone is an Assistant Professor of Law and Politics in the School of Government and Public Policy at the University of Arizona and Visiting Researcher at the ARENA Center for European Studies at the University of Oslo. He received his Ph.D. in 2019 from the Department of Politics at Princeton University, and from 2019 to 2021 he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the PluriCourts Centre at the University of Oslo in Norway. Dr. Pavone’s research and teaching interests span across comparative politics, law and society, and judicial politics. Much of his work focuses on the European Union (EU) and uses fieldwork, interview, archival, and geospatial methods to trace how lawyers and courts impact processes of political development and social change, as well as the politics of rule of law enforcement. His new book with Cambridge University Press – The Ghostwriters: Lawyers and the Politics Behind the Judicial Construction of Europe – reconstructs how entrepreneurial lawyers promoted European integration by encouraging deliberate law-breaking and mobilizing national courts against their own governments. The Ghostwriters has been praised as “the most important book on European legal integration in decades” and has won four major awards from the American Political Science Association (APSA), the Law and Society Association (LSA), and the European Union Studies Association (EUSA). Dr. Pavone’s research has also been published in leading peer-reviewed journals, including The American Political Science ReviewLaw and Society ReviewWorld PoliticsJournal of European Public Policy, and the Journal of Law and Courts.   Dr. Pavone is currently part of a large interdisciplinary research project – Enforcing the Rule of Law (ENROL): What can the European Union do to prevent rule of law deterioration from within? – that won NOK 25 million (approximately $3 million) in competitive funding from the Research Council of Norway (RCN). As part of this project, Dr. Pavone is drawing on comparative and EU theories of law enforcement and institutional change to understand the politics driving EU institutions’ responses to member states backsliding into competitive authoritarianism and undermining democracy and the rule of law.

Email: tpavone@arizona.edu

Twitter: @Tom_Pavone

Webpage: https://www.tommasopavone.com/

Dante Gatmaytan

Professor Gatmaytan teaches Constitutional Law, Legal Method, and Local Government Law. Before he entered the academe in 1998, he practiced law through public interest law offices working with rural poor communities involved in environment and natural resources law, indigenous peoples’ rights, agrarian reform, and local governance. He graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree from the Ateneo de Manila (B.S. Legal Management) in 1987 and a law degree (LL.B.) from the University of the Philippines in 1991. He holds Masters Degrees from Vermont Law School (cum laude) and the University of California, Los Angeles. Professor Gatmaytan writes on a wide range of issues which include the environment, gender, the judiciary, and the intersection of law and politics. His works have appeared in the University of Pennsylvania Asian Law Journal, the Asian Journal of Comparative Law, the Oregon Review of International Law, the UCLA Pacific Basin Law Journal, the Georgetown International Environmental Law Review, and the Harvard Women’s Law Journal among others. His primary research interests are concentrated on constitutional amendments, the interaction of law and politics, and comparative constitutionalism. Professor Gatmaytan’s books include Legal Method Essentials, Local Government Law and Jurisprudence, and Constitutional Law in the Philippines: Government Structure (published by Lexis-Nexis in 2015). His scholarship is collected in More Equal than Others: Constitutional Law and Politics, and Underclass: Public Interest Law Practice Perspectives. He served as the Head of the Information and Publication Division of the UP Law Center from 2013-2018 and is presently Director of the Institute for the Administration of Justice. 

Email:  dbgatmaytan@up.edu.ph

Webpage:  https://law.upd.edu.ph/profile/faculty-gatmaytandante/

Courtney Hillebrecht

Dr. Courtney Hillebrecht is the Hitchock Family Chair in Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, where she also directs the Forsythe Family Program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs.  She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin in 2010 and her BA in History and Spanish from Middlebury College in 2004.  Dr. Hillebrecht’s expertise is in international human rights law and international human rights and criminal adjudication.  She is the author of Saving the International Justice Regime: Beyond Backlash against International Courts (2021, Cambridge University Press) and Domestic Politics and International Human Rights Tribunals: The Problem of Compliance (2014, Cambridge University Press).  Her research also has appeared in DemocratizationThe European Journal of International RelationsForeign Policy AnalysisThe Harvard International Law JournalHuman Rights QuarterlyHuman Rights ReviewInternational InteractionsThe Journal of Human Rights, The Journal of Peace Research and The Law and Society Review, among other outlets.  Dr. Hillebrecht is also co-PI with Dr. Jillienne Haglund on an NSF-funded project on compliance with women’s rights recommendations. In addition to the NSF, her research has been supported by the Leverhulme National Trust, the Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard University, and the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. In addition to her scholarship and teaching, she serves as an Associate Editor of International Studies Quarterly as part of the 2019-2023 editorial team.  She is a former chair of the International Studies Association Human Rights Section and a founding and executive committee member of the Inter-American Human Rights Network and the Activists in International Courts Network. 

Email: chillebrecht2@unl.edu

Twitter: @c_hillebrecht

Webpage: courtneyhillebrecht.com

Elisa Arcioni

Elisa Arcioni is an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney Law School, Australia. She is a leading scholar of constitutional identity – who are ‘the people’ in the Australian Constitution? She works in the field of public law, focusing in particular on questions of inclusion and exclusion in constitutional law and politics. Elisa is interested in the way in which law interacts with identity, how judges engage in this field, how citizenship becomes constitutionalised, and how legal systems interact in that space. Elisa is currently engaged in a 3 year project on claims of belonging in Australian law and history (with Helen Irving and Rayner Thwaites). Elisa is an outgoing convenor of the International Association of Constitutional Law Research Group on Membership and Exclusion under Constitutions, a former Executive Council member of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law and former Editor of the Sydney Law Review. Elisa joined the University of Sydney Law School in 2012, prior to which she was lecturer in law at the University of Wollongong and associate to the Honourable Justice Michael Kirby, High Court of Australia.

Email: elisa.arcioni@sydney.edu.au

Twitter: @elisa_arcioni

Webpage: https://www.sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people/academic-staff/elisa-arcioni.html

Robert J. Currie 

Professor Rob Currie is Professor of Law and Distinguished Research Professor at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, where he teaches Transnational Criminal Law, Comparative Criminal Law, Public International Law, Evidence, Advocacy and Procedure. His research focuses on the points at which crimes cross borders and the various legal problems and regimes that emerge from that space. He is one of the leading exponents of the emerging discipline of Transnational Criminal Law, and his scholarly work in the field has been cited by numerous courts, including the Supreme Court of Canada. He is co-founding editor of the Transnational Criminal Law Review; co-editor of Kindred’s International Law (currently in its 9th edition, 2020); co-author of the leading treatise International & Transnational Criminal Law (currently in its 3rd edition, 2020); and co-editor/author of the Routledge Handbook of Transnational Criminal Law(2015). He frequently acts as a consultant, to both private and government clients, in cases involving cross-border criminal issues. 

E-mail: robert.currie@dal.ca

Twitter: @RobCurrieMusic

Webpage: https://www.dal.ca/faculty/law/faculty-staff/our-faculty/robert-currie.html

Guillaume Tusseau

Guillaume Tusseau was trained both in political science and law. After holding positions in the Universities of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas) and Rouen, he is currently Professor of Public Law at Sciences Po Law School, in Paris, where he is Head of the law department, and a member of the Institut universitaire de France. He has been a member of the Conseil supérieur de la magistrature (French High Council for the Judiciary) from 2015 to 2019. His main areas of interest are comparative constitutional law and legal theory, both fields in which he has extensively taught and published. Among his latest publications are: ‘The Legal Philosophy of Jeremy Bentham’: Essays on ‘Of the Limits of the Penal Branch of Jurisprudence’, Guillaume Tusseau (ed.) (Routledge, Routledge Research in Constitutional Law Series, 2014), ‘Debating Legal Pluralism and Constitutionalism: New Trajectories for Legal Theory in the Global Age’, Guillaume Tusseau (ed.) (Springer, 2020), ‘Contentieux constitutionnel comparé. Une introduction critique au droit processuel constitutionnel’ (Lextenso, 2021) and ‘Droit constitutionnel et institutions politiques’ (6th ed., Le Seuil, 2021).

Email: guillaume.tusseau@sciencespo.fr

Twitter: @GTusseau 

Webpage: https://www.sciencespo.fr/ecole-de-droit/en/profile/tusseau-guillaume.html

Matthew Martin

Matthew Martin is a PhD student in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to graduate school, he worked as a legal assistant in criminal and immigration law. He obtained a BA in Political Science and Legal Studies along with a certificate in International Relations from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His research interests include public participation in constitutional design, authoritarian constitutions, judicial politics, and immigration law and politics. At UT Austin, Matt is conducting research on the 2016 constitutional consultation process in Chile and North American tribal constitutions, and he is in the early stages of assembling a co-authored book on public consultations in constitution-making. 

Email: mjmartin@utexas.edu

Twitter: @MattJ_Martin

Webpsgr: https://mattjamesmartin.github.io/

Rahul Hemrajani 

Rahul Hemrajani is a PhD candidate at the University of South Carolina, Columbia. His research centres around studying comparative judicial institutions, including how country-level factors condition decision making by judges in a court. For his dissertation, he develops and applies a cross-national time-series measure of judicial legitimacy of court systems in over 150 countries. His published and ongoing work also focuses on judging in the Supreme Court of India, protest policing and heuristic biases in judicial decision-making. 

Email: rahulh@email.sc.edu

Twitter: @rhoiotaphi

Webpage: https://rahul.uofsccreate.org/

Fiona Shen-Bayh

Fiona Shen-Bayh is an Assistant Professor of Government at William & Mary where she also serves as a faculty affiliate of the Global Research Institute and the Data Science program. Additionally, Professor Shen-Bayh is a research affiliate of the Centre on Law and Social Transformations at the University of Bergen. She studies the politics of authoritarian regimes, specifically the legal and judicial instruments of power. Her book, Undue Process: Persecution and Punishment in Autocratic Courts (2022), examines these themes in the context of postcolonial Africa and is featured in the Cambridge Studies in Law and Society series at Cambridge University Press. In other works, she examines the challenges of promoting access to equitable justice and the legacies of autocratic rule. As co-founder and co-director of the Digital Inclusion and Governance Lab, Professor Shen-Bayh draws on a variety of digital tools and data to analyze the political economy of development in the Global South. Her research has been published in the American Political Science Review and World Politics. Shen-Bayh also received research support from the National Science Foundation, the Institute of International Studies, and the Global Research Institute. 

Email: fshenbayh@wm.edu

Twitter: @feiyonah

Webpage: www.fionashenbayh.com